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Urology Cancer Services

Prostate cancer is cancer of the prostate gland, a walnut-sized organ found only in men. It is located between the penis and the bladder, and surrounds the urethra.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK.

Cancer is when abnormal cells start to divide and grow in an uncontrolled way. The prostate gland produces a protein called prostate specific antigen (PSA). A blood test can measure the level of PSA.

Prostate cancer may show symptoms, but in some cases, there may be no obvious sign that there is a problem.

Prostate cancer differs from other cancers found in the body in the fact that small deposits of cancer within the prostate are very common and remain dormant for some time before they progress. 1 in 3 men over 50 have a small focus of prostate cancer. Nearly all men over 80 have a focus of prostate cancer.

Causes of prostate cancer can be a variety of reasons such as family history, a high intake of animal fats and protein. Statistics have shown menwho are from afro-caribbean decent are more likely to develop prostate cancer than those from asian decent.

Your Cancer Team

We have a multidisciplinary team of specialists (This includes consultant urological surgeons, radiologists, clinical and medical oncologists, and clinical nurse specialists) who care for and agree the plan of treatment for each patient.

Cancer Nurse Specialists: Also known as your key worker. They play a key role in supporting you and your family through your cancer journey and beyond. They provide a vital link between patients and families with medical teams involved in the cancer patient pathway.

Clinical Oncologists: Physicians that specialise in management of cancer treatments including radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted treatments and immunotherapy.

Radiologists: Radiologists are doctors that specialise in undertaking scans, using them to obtain tissue samples to diagnose cancer and work out its extent.?

Histopathology: This is the diagnosis of cancer through detailed analysis of the biopsy or cancer tissues which are removed during an operation, and involves examining tissues and/or cells under a microscope. Histopathologists are responsible for making tissue diagnoses and helping clinicians manage understand the treatments required for a patients cancer care.

Prostate cancer differs from other cancers found in the body in the fact that small deposits of cancer within the prostate are very common and remain dormant for some time before they progress. } }1 in 3 men over 50 have a small focus of prostate cancer } }Nearly all men over 80 have a focus of prostate cancer

Signs and Symptoms

Early stage prostate cancer may not cause any signs or symptoms. Symptoms commonly noted during the advanced stage include:

  • Trouble urinating
  • Frequent urination
  • Decreased force of urination
  • Difficulty starting or stopping urine stream
  • Blood in semen
  • Pain or discomfort in the pelvic area
  • Bone pain

The NHS has further information please click here to access.

Diagnosis and tests

When diagnosing prostate cancer you will be required to have a number of special tests and examinations in the urology clinic. Most men who attend a urology clinic are found not to have prostate cancer.

Treatment

Radiotherapy and hormone therapy are some of the possible treatments for prostate cancer. Men at low risk for progression may opt for active surveillance, meaning treatment is deferred and the cancer is closely monitored with frequent PSA blood tests, digital rectal exams and repeat biopsies. If the cancer has not spread, surgery to remove the prostate and nearby lymph nodes is often recommended.

In some cases, these treatments may be used in combination for greater effect.